DADDY YANKEE NEW SINGLE “SHAKY SHAKY”

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Daddy Yankee did more than anyone to establish reggaeton as a marketable music style during the early 21st century. Yankee’s success was so phenomenal in the wake of his 2004 mainstream breakthrough, Barrio Fino — and in particular the international hit single “Gasolina” — that he transcended cultural boundaries and genre trappings. He became more than just a reggaetonero, having transformed himself into an international name brand by the time his 2007 follow-up album, El Cartel: The Big Boss, was released. Daddy Yankee’s name, image, and music were used to sell soft drinks for Pepsi and footwear for Reebok, as well as a syndicated show for ABC Radio Networks (Daddy Yankee on Fuego) and a feature film for Paramount Pictures (Talento de Barrio). Daddy Yankee indeed had become a business empire, of which the primary asset — his music — remained independent from major-label control: he keenly operated his own independent label, El Cartel Records, and chose to partner with labels such as Interscope only for purposes of marketing and distribution. Although the business side of Daddy Yankee threatened to overshadow his music, Barrio Fino stands tall as the definitive reggaeton album of its time. Boasting a pair of fantastic hits, “Gasolina” and “Lo Que Pasó, Pasó,” the album was a standard-bearer, influencing a legion of followers and establishing the production duo Luny Tunes as reggaeton’s hottest hitmakers. Barrio Fino was also the first reggaeton album to reach number one on the Top Latin Album chart, a position it held for roughly a year’s time while selling over a million copies in the United States alone.

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Born Ramón Ayala (aka Raymond) on February 3, 1977, in Río Piedras, the largest district of San Juan, Puerto Rico, Daddy Yankee grew up in a musical family. His father was a bongosero (i.e., a salsa percussionist), his mother’s family included numerous musicians, and he himself sang from an early age, with a knack for improvisation. As Daddy Yankee grew older, he took an interest in Spanish-language hip-hop, especially the socially aware raps of Vico C, and he became increasingly drawn into the street life of his neighborhood, the Villa Kennedy housing project in San Juan. The “Yankee” moniker arose from the Puerto Rican slang for “someone tall, who is big in what he does” (according to a 2005 interview with Billboard magazine); “Big Daddy” is thus the rough English translation of Daddy Yankee. He got into reggaeton just as it was taking shape in the early ’90s, when San Juan DJs would spin hip-hop alongside dancehall reggae while vocalists would freestyle over the beats. This convergence of hip-hop, dancehall, and freestyling proved popular in San Juan, most notably at the Noise, a long-running club night that spawned a collective of DJs and rappers. Besides the Noise, the other key proprietor of proto-reggaeton was Playero, a mixtape DJ/producer with whom Daddy Yankee got his start, debuting as a featured guest on Playero 37 (1992). A few years later, at age 18, Daddy Yankee made his full-length album debut, No Mercy (1995), again working with Playero. Little came of No Mercy, however, and he continued to work the reggaeton underground for the remainder of the ’90s. Toward the end the decade, he began performing alongside Nicky Jam as a duo and had one of his songs, “Posición,” a collaboration with Alberto Stylee, featured on the 1998 One Tough Cop soundtrack.

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Beginning in 2000, Daddy Yankee furthered his career significantly with independently released albums. El Cartel (2000) and El Cartel, Vol. 2 (2001) came first, each laden with featured guests in mixtape fashion; however, El Cangri.com (2002) was the one that really gave his career the boost it needed to break outside Puerto Rico. Driven by “Latigazo,” a single that found airplay in Miami and New York, El Cangri.com climbed all the way to number 43 on Billboard’s Top Latin Albums chart despite no major-label backing whatsoever (released instead by VI Music, a Puerto Rican indie). In the wake of this success, Daddy Yankee assembled Los Homerun-es (2003), a Top Ten album comprised of odds and ends, including a newly recorded hit single, “Segurosqui,” as well as some old Playero tracks from a decade prior. Reggaeton was on the cusp of breaking big-time at this point; touchstone albums such as Don Omar’s The Last Don (2003), Tego Calderón’s El Abayarde (2003), and Luny Tunes’ Mas Flow (2003) were making significant impacts in Miami and New York, in addition to Puerto Rico, and a wave of lesser albums were being released also. The stage was well set for Daddy Yankee’s mainstream breakthrough, Barrio Fino (2004), which was released in July 2004 (by VI Music in conjunction with Universal Music Group Distribution) and debuted at number one on the Top Latin Albums chart. The first reggaeton album to reach the number one spot, Barrio Fino would dominate the top of the Latin albums chart for roughly a year’s time, lodged there well into 2005. It sold over a million copies in the U.S. alone during this chart reign.

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The long shelf life of Barrio Fino was partly on account of “Gasolina,” a party-oriented single whose appeal was so phenomenal that the song itself became synonymous with reggaeton in the minds of many (and perhaps remains so), especially English-speakers who were unacquainted with the music style. The appeal of “Gasolina” was such that it’s been compared to “Macarena,” another Latin party song that broke through cultural boundaries to become a dance club staple internationally. It took “Gasolina” awhile to become a craze, several months after the release of Barrio Fino, in fact, yet by November 2004 it had broken into the Billboard Hot 100 and eventually made it all the way to number 32 a couple months later (a genuine Top 40 hit, albeit a novel one). On the Latin charts, though, “Gasolina” didn’t even break the Top Ten, only reaching number 17. Rather, “Lo Que Pasó, Pasó” was the album’s big hit on the Latin scene, charting at number two. Barrio Fino spawned a few other singles as well: “Sabor a Melao” (featuring salsa superstar Andy Montañez), “No Me Dejes Solo” (featuring Wisin & Yandel), and “Like You” (an English-language song). The success of the album was such that it catapulted Luny Tunes — an industrious duo who’d produced half the album, and all the key hits — to stardom of their own, as they became widely recognized as reggaeton undisputed go-to hitmakers. The success of the album also drew significant major-label attention. Machete Music, a Universal company specializing in Latin urban, signed a deal with Daddy Yankee to re-release Los Homerun-es in March 2005 (and later Barrio Fino in December 2006). Meanwhile, VI Music cashed in with Ahora le Toca al Cangri (2005), a live CD/DVD recorded in Puerto Rico in 2003.

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In 2005, while the major labels were courting Daddy Yankee, the president of Interscope, Jimmy Iovine, whose roster includes Eminem, 50 Cent, and Dr. Dre, actually flew down to Puerto Rico to discuss business in person. A joint venture deal resulted between Interscope and Daddy Yankee’s own label, El Cartel Records. The first release under this partnership was Barrio Fino en Directo (2005), a CD/DVD comprised of live in-concert and newly recorded material. “Rompe,” one of the newly recorded songs, was issued as the lead single and charted even better than “Gasolina” had, reaching number 24 on the Hot 100. Moreover, it spent 15 weeks atop the Hot Latin Tracks chart. The Interscope deal was only one of many struck by Daddy Yankee at this point. He began lending his name, image, and music to everything from footwear (Reebok) and soft drinks (Pepsi) to automobiles (Citroën) and radio (ABC); he founded his own charity, Corazón Guerrero, to help ex-convicts; and he teamed with CMN (Cardenas Marketing Network, an event marketing and sponsorship agency) to mount an international tour throughout North, Central, and South America. All the while, he worked intermittently on his next album, El Cartel: The Big Boss (2007), a big-budget affair bringing together an ensemble cast of marquee-name collaborators, including pop-rap hitmakers will.i.am, Akon, and Scott Storch. The buildup to the album was well planned and pervasive, with “Impacto” (and its bilingual remix featuring Fergie) released as the lead single well in advance of the eagerly anticipated June release date. Daddy Yankee then starred in a movie, Talento de Barrio, which broke attendance records in Puerto Rico and helped fuel sales of the film’s soundtrack, which Daddy Yankee performed with a host of guests. His 2010 effort Mundial featured less hip-hop and pop, more Latin flavors, and the hit single “Descontrol.” His sixth album Prestige followed in 2011, posting several singles high in the charts, including “Ven Conmigo” and “Lovumba.”

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 In 2012, when El Cartel house producers Musicologo & Menes began issuing a series of collaboration albums titled Imperio Nazza, it was only natural that Yankee would appear at some point; he finally stepped up a year later with the King Daddy Edition. which also featured Divino, Yandel, Farruko, Arcángel, and J Alvarez. Its success sparked the planning of a second volume for 2015. ~ Jason Birchmeier, Rovi

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            LIKE OF SKAKY  SHAKYhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aKuivabiOns

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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NICKY JAM EUROPEAN TOUR PART 1

Nicky Jam real name NICK RIVERA CAMINERO is a singer and composer of reggaetón. He was born in Boston, Massachusetts in 1980 a port Rican father and a Dominican mother needed. Nicky Jam has worked with personalities like Daddy Yankee, Don Chezina, Lito y Polaco in the past.

He is one of the most interesting and popular singers in the genre right now.

He began his rhythms on “I’m not your husband”, “yo no soy tu marido” much appreciated on similar themes rather merengue.

The last of the albums to which he has contributed is El Disco de Reggaeton, which compiles some of the best success of the largest reggaetoneros, Nicky Jam brought it: Dile, La Gata and Me voy pal party.

Nicky Jam has just received 4 times Platinum Awards Sony Music Italy with his song “EL PERDON” a duet with Enrique Iglesias which allowed him to emerge from the shadows and makes a great return on the scene.For the first time he “

for the year 2015.”

Congratulations around Europe singing.

NICKY JAM IN ITALY 4 AWARD PLATINUM

 

NICKY JAM IN CONCERT IN PARIS 10/10/2015

               Nicky Jam in concert At Paris ( France) 10 october 2015 .

Nick Rivera Caminero (born March 17, 1980),known by his stage name Nicky Jam, is a singer and songwriter. He is best known for the hit “El Perdón“.

Nicky Jam was born in Boston, Massachusetts to a Puerto Rican father and a Dominican mother, however he later moved with his family to Barrio Obrero in Puerto Rico when he was six years old. He has been in reggaeton since his youth. The name “Nicky Jam” was jokingly given to Caminero by a homeless man. Caminero’s family was low-income and as a minor he performed illegal work in a grocery store in order to help support them, in his free time improvising in front of his workplace. One day a music executive noticed his talent and signed him, and at the age of eleven he recorded his first album “Distinto a los Demas”. The album was not successful, but it did gain him recognition in the music industry, and warranted the attention of some music producers such as DJ Joe, DJ Playero and DJ Chiklin.

Yankee and Nicky Jam: Los CangrisAfter his first album, he continued working in the music industry creating many hits. Thanks to those hits, Nicky Jam had the opportunity to meet Daddy Yankee. They met when they were recording with Guatauba and DJ Playero. Daddy Yankee offered Nicky Jam to work with him and thanks to this opportunity a strong friendship began. During the late ’90s and early 2000s, they became close friends and formed the unofficial Daddy Yankee and Nicky Jam duo, also known as, Los Cangris. They created many well known hit singles such as “Sabanas Blancas”, “Guayando”, “Sentirte” and many others. They also worked together on the album “Los Super Amigos” in 2000 which was never released. Due to personal issues, they ended their friendship in 2004 and stopped working together. Nicky Jam continued working as a solo artist and created many hits as well as Daddy Yankee.

Nicky Jam: solo career

Nicky Jam rose to fame after the release of Haciendo Escante in 2001. However he didn’t gain international recognition until 2004 with the release of Vida Escante. He and Daddy Yankee separated due to many arguments and conflicts between the two thus resulting in a rivalry. This rivalry led both artists to “tiraera”. Due to Daddy Yankee‘s popularity at the time, many saw Nicky Jam as the “bad guy” in the whole rivalry and became very disliked. His most recent studio album is The Black Carpet released in 2007. Throughout his career, Nicky Jam, has worked with many artists like Daddy Yankee, R.K.M & Ken-Y, Héctor & Tito (Hector el Father and Tito El Bambino), Lito & Polaco, Big Boy, Magnate & Valentino and many others. However by the late 2000s, his career suffered a decline. He decided to move to Medellin, Colombia in 2010 after performing a few concerts there. In Colombia, Nicky Jam found the attention from the fans he needed and had the opportunity to restart his career. Thanks to the Colombian audience, he made a powerful comeback with his successful singles: “Tu Primera Vez”, “Piensas en Mi”, “Curiosidad”, “Juegos Prohibidos” and, most notably, “Voy A Beber”. He also worked with Daddy Yankee again, after 8 years of not working together, on the album Prestige by Daddy Yankee. Nicky Jam has appeared in many reggaeton albums, currently holding the record for most appearances on various artist albums, which was formerly held by Daddy Yankee. His most recent album appearance is with Daddy Yankee‘s album Prestige, with the track “El Party Me Llama”.

CONTACT NICKY JAM : booking@nickyjampr.net

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NICKY JAM IN ITALY 4 AWARD PLATINUM

http://www.instagram.com/nickyjampr

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